Recent publications by one of our #DataImpactFellows

Bram Vanhoutte, one of our Data Impact Impact Fellows, shares some recent publications.

I have a research methods chapter on how to use sequence analysis which has just come out: https://www.academia.edu/36480203/Sequence_Analysis_of_Life_History_Data

and also an article on the health and wellbeing in later life of British people who emigrated to Australia under the “Ten Pound Poms” scheme compared to English and Australians:
https://www.academia.edu/36289649/Selection_adaptation_and_advantage._Later-_life_health_and_wellbeing_of_English_migrants_to_Australia

Recent publications:

Vanhoutte, B., Prattley, J. & Wahrendorf, M. (2018) Sequence Analysis with Life Course Data. In: Liamputtong, P. (ed) Handbook of Research Methods in Health Social Sciences, (pp.1-19) Singapore: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-981-10-2779-6_146-1

Vanhoutte, B., Loh, V., Nazroo, J. Kendig, H., O’Loughlin, K., & Byles, J. (2018) Selection, adaptation and advantage: later life health and wellbeing of English migrants to Australia. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. DOI:10.1080/1369183X.2018.1446823

Vanhoutte, B., Wahrendorf, M. & Nazroo, J. (2017) Duration, timing and order. How housing histories relate to later life wellbeing. Journal of Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 8(3), 227-243. DOI:10.14301/llcs.v8i3.445


bram vanhoutte

Bram Vanhoutte@bvhoutteis one of the UK Data Service Data Impact Fellows. Bram is a Research Fellow in Sociology at the Cathie Marsh Institute for Social Research at The University of Manchester. The main focus of his research is the different ways in which people age, and in particular how ageing is influenced by individuals’ earlier lives.

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